Geylang Bazaar stall sells 'plastic' keropok? Don’t believe such fake news, says AVA

The Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) has responded to a Stomp query, refuting claims made in a viral Facebook video alleging that a Geylang Ramadan bazaar stall sold ‘plastic’ keropok, otherwise known as 'keropok lekor'.

In its statement issued by the agency on Thursday (May 24), the AVA asked the public not to believe in the claims made in the video posted by Facebook user Anissul Asaad on Tuesday (May 22).

The video which has since garnered over 460,000 views shows a man, and a woman carrying a child standing in front of a stall, while another person films the trio.

Sedih sekali kalau bangsa sendiri nak jatuh kan sesama sendiri ..
Kalau bende tu plastic dah tentu bende tu cair pakcik oi ..
Ape pendapat semua ?

Posted by Anissul Asaad on Tuesday, 22 May 2018

Apparently, the man had purchased a pack of the crackers from the stall and attempted to set a cracker on fire with a lighter.

The man, standing before the stall owner, then tries to set another part of the cracker on fire.

Meanwhile, his companions can be heard saying, “if this is not plastic, it should not burn right? We just bought this.”

The man then tells the owner in Malay:

“Please don’t sell these Keropoks. They are plastic.

“Are these crackers supposed to be this flammable?

“Crackers are not supposed to burn like this.

“I can tell that they’re made from plastic just from the smell. Please do not sell this.”

Meanwhile, another voice can be heard, saying:

“I’m sad. I just ate something that is made from plastic.

“I can’t believe I ate plastic!”

Another voice responds, saying, “I know, I know.”

In an accompanying caption to the video, Assad himself also disagreed with the man in the video.

He wrote in Malay:

"It's so sad that our own people would bring down other people.

"If something is made of plastic, for sure it would have melted, uncle.

"What do you think?"

AVA said the claim of the crackers being plastic because of how easily they burn is unfounded. 

The agency said that it had not received any feedback on the cracker, and have not detected any fake food in Singapore thus far.

It added that “In actual fact, food products that contain fats, carbohydrates, and protein can burn in this manner and become charred.”

AVA also urged the public to be vigilant and beware of such fake news.

When in doubt, members of the public can check with official information sources including its website.